Category Archives: actuaries

Cridland and the price of state dependency


  John Cridland’s consultation report into the state pension age, commissioned by Ros Altmann and delivered today, does not say quite what the modernisers wanted it to. Accelerated pension ages and the scrapping of the triple lock deliver a double … Continue reading

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Pensions Resurgent! The merit of the CWU’s proposals to the Royal Mail


For the third day I am returning to the CWU’s proposals to the Royal Mail which I now consider the most important break through in pension scheme design we have seen in Britain this century. I base this on three … Continue reading

Posted in actuaries, advice gap, David Pitt-Watson, dc pensions, defined ambition, defined aspiration, pensions | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Was DC the only choice for the Tata Steelworkers?


      Speaking on the radio yesterday, John Ralfe called the decision of Tata Staff to accept the loss of future accrual into a final salary scheme in exchange for a 10% contribution into a DC pension fund as … Continue reading

Posted in actuaries, advice gap, FinTech, Jersey, pensions, Pensions Regulator, Politics, pot | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

We do not need another consultation on costs and charges.


A report in Professional Pensions that we are to get yet another consultation on costs and charges fill me with gloom. As the report points out, we have two consultations on the subject – in progress. They follow an exhaustive call … Continue reading

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Diversity, Narratives* and Pensions (Con Keating)


This blog first appeared in Professional Pensions, if you’ve read it before, read it again. “What we observe is not nature itself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning.”    W. Heisenberg, Physics and Philosophy: The Revolution in Modern … Continue reading

Posted in actuaries, advice gap, Bankers, pensions | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

“Famine or feast pensions”- demand advice is better spread.


Where you work not how you work determines your pension prospects. If you choose to work for a blue chip company or for the Government you can expect at worst a high contribution to a workplace pension and at best a … Continue reading

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Over-consulting ; not a victimless crime!


I was “distressed” to read of a new way of extracting fees from the sponsors of DC pensions, the value for money review/assessment. http://tinyurl.com/ju4ppnp Ok – I wasn’t distressed – I was cross! Value for Money is not as complicated … Continue reading

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Plugging phoney deficits does no good!


We have become fixated with phoney pension deficits, now a British pension consultancy is suggesting we can plug phoney deficits with real money, the dividends that support “other people’s pensions. This is what we think of the phoney deficits. Our … Continue reading

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FABI says “no no” to the deficit yo-yo!


The First Actuarial Best-estimate Index (FABI) continues on a more predictable flight. An actuary speaks! Rob Hammond, who oversees the number crunching behind FABI says: “Yo-yo deficits do nothing to restore people’s confidence in their pensions. FABI paints a truer … Continue reading

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The Alice in Wonderland world of pension deficits.


FTSE grows, deficits up? The first business day of the month is pension horror month where JLT announce new angles on the disastrous state of our Defined Benefit schemes. Deficits actually fell last month but JLT still managed to report … Continue reading

Posted in accountants, actuaries, pensions | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments